How to Not Make Organizational Change More Difficult

How to Not Make Organizational Change More Difficult
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Do Not Make Organizational Change More Difficult than It Needs to Be
Most leaders focus on making change better but forget how to NOT make organizational change more difficult.  Organizational change is difficult to manage successfully…employees usually resist out of a kind of fear of upsetting the more comfortable status quo.

How To Treat Those Most Affected by Organizational Change
Change management consulting experts have all kinds of advice on how to introduce, manage and communicate change, but as hard as change leaders try, there will still be some challenges and frustration. Experienced leaders know those most affected by change must be held accountable for the desired change, encouraged to embrace the “new way” over the “old way”, and helped to emphasize continuous learning.

They also know they should not make things worse whenever possible.

Three Field-Tested Change Management Tips to Follow
Here are three tips on how to NOT make organizational change more difficult than it has to be:

  1. Do Not Underestimate the Challenge of Change
    Acknowledge and appreciate the difficulty for all concerned while focusing on only the critical few goals, having a solid action plan, and having a clear definition of success.
  2. Do Not Fight the Politics that Exist in Every Organization
    You may not like it, but it’s the way things work – at least for the time being. If you buck the current political system or cultural norms, you risk upsetting power structures and relationships that have been in place and have supported function and performance.  Politics during organizational change can show up as a failure to agree, unclear decision making, relationships ruling, passing the buck, complacency, sabotage, and even corruption.
  3. Do Not Condemn the Masses for the Few
    If there are a few disgruntled employees who need extra support or guidance, talk to them individually. Addressing the group as a whole will only alienate those who are trying to embrace and get on board with the change.

The Bottom Line
Experienced leaders know those most affected by change must be held accountable for the desired change, encouraged to embrace the “new way” over the “old way”, and helped to emphasize continuous learning if they want to get the desired results.

To learn more about organizational change, download The 5 New Lenses of Change Leadership

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